Rowdyism At Axedale 1881

From: The Ballarat Courier (Vic: 1869-1884; 1914-1918) Thursday, 19 May 1881, page 3

ROWDYISM AT AXEDALE.

A most disgraceful case of ruffianism has been reported to the Sandhurst police. A tea meeting was advertised to take place at St. Nicholas’ Roman Catholic Church, Axedale, about fourteen miles from Sandhurst, on Saturday. A mob of young toughs, numbering over a dozen, and known as the Back Creek larrikins,.appeared on the scene, and demanded food or blood.

The ladies, who were preparing the tables,” beat a hasty retreat, and the ruffians regaled themselves on the eatables provided. They then proceeded to smash the crockery and damage the place.”

They “next collected a quantity of bushes, and stacked them under the schoolroom. These they ignited, but fortunately the flames were put out before much damage was done. A man in the employment of Mr Craike, a well known vigneron in the neighborhood, who had been sent by his master to the school, with a present of fruit, was savagely set upon by the ruffians, and had his eye badly cut with a knuckleduster, which one of the gang wore.

Another man, had his eye blackened, and was otherwise maltreated. The cowardly gang assaulted old and young alike, and then attempted to steal the money taken for admission. Several of the ruffians are well known to the police, and warrants have been issued. Hopes are entertained that the whole gang will be arrested and severely punished – Herald

**Please note: Punctuation and paragraphs have been added to the above transcription for ease and speed of reading

ROWDYISM AT AXEDALE. (1881, May 19). The Ballarat Courier (Vic. : 1869 – 1884; 1914 – 1918), p. 3. Retrieved July 15, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article249288041

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Brutal Assault on a Constable at Axedale 1901

From: The Bendigo Independent (Vic. : 1891 – 1918), Monday, 21 January 1901, p. 3.

BRUTAL ASSAULT ON A CON STABLE AT AXEDALE.
A PRISONER RESCUED.

Joseph Teasdale, 40 years, laborer of Woodend, a man of powerful build, was presented before the mayor (Mr. S. Ryan) and Mr. J. Watson, on three separate charges of inciting a prisoner to resist arrest, assaulting the police, and doing damage to Government property at Axedale on the previous day.

Inspector Hehir prosecuted.
Mounted Constable Kerr, who limped feebly, into the witness box, stated that he was on duty at Axedale township at 12.20 p.m. on the previous day, when he found 15 or 16 men who had arrived with a thrasher, drinking at the Campaspe Hotel. One of the number named John Roche, became most insulting in his remarks, and used very bad language. Witness therefore arrested him for using obscene language.

He was proceeding to the lockup with his man, when Teasdale followed them up and said that no constable should lock his mate up. The constable told the man to go about his business, but he further incited prisoner to resist, and said “If I have to do six months you won’t take him.” at the same time striking witness a violent blow on the ear and knocking him down.

Witness still stuck to his prisoner, but Teasdale kept striking him, and dragging the prisoner away, and finally freed Roche, who ran away into the bush. The constable, considering that Teasdale was the worse offender of the two, determined to arrest him. Teasdale, however, threw him, and, when he recovered his feet kicked him in the abdomen. He was very violent, and said not a policeman in the force could take him.

Witness was becoming exhausted with the severe struggle, but fortunately Mr. Edward Drake, licensee of the Campaspe Hotel, came to his assistance. The combined efforts of the two men were powerless to secure the prisoner, who fought and bit desperately. A second civilian, named Denis Doody, came to their assistance, and after a struggle lasting for half an hour they at length handcuffed Teasdale, and placed him in the look-up.

The three who had effected his arrest were completely exhausted. The constable was bruised all about the body and had his hand bitten. Mr. Drake also had a finger severely bitten and sustained injuries about the body.

When in the cell, prisoner behaved like a roaring boast, and smashed to pieces the utensil there. The man was not drunk, and had only had two drinks in Axedale. Witness stated that be would be unfit for active duty for a week. It was very fortunate, witness added, that prisoner was not placed on a more serious charge. If it had not been for the assistance of the two civilians he would have been seriously injured.

Prisoner: I have no recollection of anything. I have never been in a court before. I have always been in the habit of assisting the police instead of taking action against them. I don’t know what occurred. I can’t ask any questions.

Edward Drake stated that the constable was in a very exhausted condition when he came to his assistance. They did not secure prisoner until he had kicked the constable on the head, and used his teeth pretty freely. The man was not under the influence of drink.

Prisoner further stated that before arriving, at Axedale, he had had eight or nine drinks at an hotel. As a rule he did not drink, because he once had a sunstroke. He was very sorry indeed for what he had done. It was his first offence. He was a married man with a family to support and wanted to get back to them.

The chairman said prisoner was charged with very serious offences. If it had not been his first offence the penalty would be very severe, for his conduct was most brutal. He was fined £2 for inciting to resist, £2 for assaulting the constable, £1 with 7s 6d for damaging property, or one month imprisonment in default, and ordered to pay 33s 3d costs. Prisoner asked tor time in which to pay. Inspector Hehir objected to the request, and it was refused.

*Please note Punctuation and paragraphs have been added to the above transcription for ease and speed of reading

BRUTAL ASSAULT ON A CON STABLE AT AXEDALE. (1901, January 21). The Bendigo Independent (Vic. : 1891 – 1918), p. 3. Retrieved May 4, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article193622202

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Affiliation Case Axedale 1904

From:  Bendigo Advertiser, Tuesday, 20 September 1904, page 4

AFFILIATION CASE.

Much time was taken up at the City Court yesterday in hearing a ease in which Bridget McGrath, a young unmarried woman, proceeded against James Hawkins, for the maintenance of his illegitimate child. The parties both reside in the Axedale district. Mr. Kirby appeared for complainant, and Mr. O’Halloran for defendant.

In answer to Mr. Kirby, complainant stated that on the 10th October Inst. Hawkins, who is the son of a neighbor, in company with a man named Frawley, came to her home. She gave them afternoon tea, and the two men then went outside to sharpen their axes. After doing this, Frawley departed, and witness went out to take in some clothes off the line.

She took them into her bedroom, and Hawkins followed her, and took advantage of her. About the first of May, she asked Hawkins to marry her, her sister Nellie, also asking him. Hawkins was promised a farm, and a sum of money, if he would marry her, but he refused. She had been put to a good deal of expense by her confinement. Ellen McGrath, sister of the previous witness, deposed, that when she found out her sister’s condition, she spoke to Hawkins. He denied the paternity, and said he had only put his hands on complainant’s shoulder.

James Hawkins, the defendant, denied on oath having anything to do with Miss McGrath on the day mentioned. He admitted, however, being at the house for some time on that day, but nothing unusual occurred. It was only about 10 minutes from the time Frawley left, till Nellie Hawkins arrived at the house. .

After taking farther evidence, the magistrates adjourned the court for 10 minutes, to consider their verdict. On returning, Mr. Moore P.M., said that they had decided that the complainant had proved her case.

An order was made for the payment of 7/6 per week, with £10 pre-maternity expenses, and £3/7 costs. The defendant was ordered to find one surety of £50, as a guarantee that he will comply with the order. On the application of Mr. O’Halloran, three days were allowed, to find the surety.

*Please note Punctuation and paragraphs have been added to the above transcription for ease and speed of reading

“AFFILIATION CASE.” Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918) 20 September 1904: 4. Web. 11 Sep 2020 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article100524863&gt;.

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