How Axedale was named

The following article was printed in the Axedale Antics, May 2009 issue. 

Have you ever wondered how Axedale got it’s name?

Situated where the McIvor Highway meets the Campaspe River, Axedale is believed to have taken it’s name from the old ‘Axe’ or ‘Axedale Station’, which was first licensed to A. Jennings and George Playne in 1840. It was taken out under licence number 64 of the Westernport Squatting District, for 67,000 acres. This was part of the original Campaspe Plains run and was estimated to carry 12,000 sheep.

The run changed hands a number of times, until 1859, when the station came into the hands of Charles Vaughn and Edward Wild.

Vaughn landed in Port Phillip in 1841, and was appointed inspector of markets in 1845. He was an accountant, financier and pastoralist, as well as being a Justice of the Peace and a member of the Legislative Council of Victoria from 1856 to 1864.

In 1855, Patrick Drake built and operated the Campaspe Hotel – it remained a family business for many years.

The ‘Victorian Gazetter’ of 1865, described Axedale as a postal township in the electoral district of Mandurang, under the control of the Strathfieldsaye Roads Board.

There was a steam driven flour mill and a coach service to Sandhurst.  There were seven hotels – Campaspe, Raglan, Perseverance, Shamrock, Union, Freemasons and Commercial.

The township of Axedale was laid out shortly after the Crimean War and the Raglan Hotel took it’s name from Lord Raglan. Some of the streets perpetuate names associated with the war.

Strathfieldsaye was the nations’s gift to the Duke of Wellington after Waterloo, according to ‘Accent on Axedale’ (1970), and many of the old official names have a Wellingtonian flavour.

In the 1860s, Nathaniel Ingram selected land in Axedale and opened a bluestone quarry on the eastern side of the Campaspe River. This quarry produced dressed curbing and pitchers for use in Bendigo. Evidence of this can be seen in the Bendigo Creek and curbing in the streets. A fine example of dressed stone can be seen in the Axedale Roman Catholic Church. – Axedale Antics, May 2009 issue

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The Axedale Catholic Church is a wonderful example of Axedale bluestone

A model Country School

from: The Bendigo Independant, 19 April 1902

Model country school

A Model Country School

AT AXEDALE.

Several of the State school inspectors at present visiting the Bendigo district, called at the Axedale State school, ” No. . 1008 (Mr. E.A. Whitelock head teacher), and entered the following report  in the register: April 18, 1902

 

“We paid an unannounced visit today. .We find the school to be thoroughly well organised and taught. The school largely works itself, as the pupils and monitors are interested in their school life, and have both well trained in their various duties. . The teacher keeps in touch with all classes.

The teaching largely achieves the valuable results of getting the children to think, and then to express themselves fully. There is an absence of routine work. There is no mere repetition of the teacher’s thoughts. The writing, arithmetic etc. seen, are excellent.

The commendable tone in the school can have been created only by skilful devotion to the best interests of the children. The school room is a picture of neatness and taste, and is well equipped with apparatus of all kinds, growing plants, pictures, diagrams etc.

We consider Mr. Whitelock’s work and influence here worthy of the department’s recognition. We hope the parents are appreciative.

This highly creditable report bears the signatures of no less than four inspectors, namely: Mr. A. Fussell, district inspector; Mr. P. Goyen, chief inspector, Otago, New Zealand; Mr. Wm. Hamilton (Castlemaine District) and Mr T.W. Bothroyd of the Maryborough district

 

(Punctuation and paragraphs  have been added to the above transcription for ease and speed of reading)

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227558242

Axedale Library

Axedale now his it’s own library agency. Situated in the Axedale Community Hall, the library is open on Friday from 2-5, and is manned by an enthuastic bunch of local volunteers, with support from the Bendigo Goldfields Library.

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Community volunteers with Bendigo Goldfields staff being congratulated by Cr. Yvonne Wrigglesworth, Eppalock Ward Councillor

The library will have an extensive stock of books, DVDs, CDs, audio books and magazines. These can be ordered for convenience through the library website.

The Axedale Library is more than just a libary. Locals can drop in for a cuppa with friends or chat to the librarians.
 There is also a community trading table, which is becoming very popular. Bring along excess produce from your garden and swap it for other produce from the table. If you don’t have produce to donate, you can purchase goodies for a gold coin donation. All proceeds go to the community.

Concert at Drake’s Hall 1915

from: The Advocate, Saturday 04 September, 1915, page 14

drakes hall

transcription:     AXEDALE

At Mr. Drake’s Hall on Wednesday, 25th August, the annual concert was held, in aid of the funds of St. Mary’s Church. The Rev. M. Heffernan occupied the chair.

The attendance was very large and the programme good. The following ladies and gentlemen contributed items: — Misses M. Bentley, C. Ronan, V. O’Donnell, E. and M. O’Connor, and C. J. Drake, Messrs. W. Ruth, J. Herrick J. R. McDonald, and A. Brown.

Mrs. W. Ruth acted as accompanist, and her playing was a feature of the programme.

The manner in which the artists rendered their respective items must have been pleasing to the party who travelled from Bendigo over bad roads to entertain the residents of Axedale.

Mr. C. Burke, of Bendigo, with his usual generosity, placed his fine car at the disposal of the artists. He also contributed to the funds by raffling a clock which was won by Mr. R. O’Brien, of the Crown Hotel, Bendigo (ticket No. 39)

Mr. W. Hawkins acted as secretary, and was ably assisted by a ladies committee, with, Misses D. Neylon and A Brown as joint secretaries. The Rev. chairman thanked all who assisted to make the concert such a social and financial success.

(Punctuation and paragraphs  have been added to the above transcription for ease and speed of reading)

St. Patrick’s Day Fun 1916

from: The McIvor Times and Rodney Advertiser, 23 March 1916, page 2

St. Patrick's Day Carnival

 

transcription:

St Patrick’s Sports Carnival. A successful gathering will Show a handsome profit. St. Patrick’s Day was commemorated in Heathcote yesterday, when a sports carnival was held in the show grounds.

The committee were favored with exceptionally fine weather, and in consequence there was a nice attendance of townsfolk and visitors from the surrounding districts, together with a goodly number of patrons from a distance. Upon this occasion of the local celebration of St Patricks’ Day, the sports program was slightly varied. a number of horse and hunting events being substituted for the dancing competitions, with the happiest results, both from an enjoyable standpoint and financially, thus making the celebration an undeniable success.

The excellent and interesting program was run off without a hitch, and the committee is deserving of every praise for the creditable manner in which they carried out their various and sometimes arduous duties. The hunting and jumping competitions proved to be a very pleasing and attractive innovation, inasmuch as the horses competing were some of the best of their class -notably, those belonging to Messrs. Glens, Hicks, and Robin’s animals, which, by the way, were exhibited at the recent show of the Heathcote Agricultural, Horticultural and Pastoral Society.

The Draught Horse Handicap was somewhat of a novelty, and attracted no mean amount of interest, while causing much merriment. Specially admired were the selections rendered by De Gilio’s String Baud, and the committee is deserving of every praise for securing their services. Every event on the program was closely contested, and got off well to time, with the result that there was not a dull moment all day.

Additional amusement was also afforded both young and old by the presence of numerous counter attractions, and these were liberally patronised. The fruit and lolly stall was conducted by Miss Morrison, assisted by Misses Farley (2) and Lacey. Mesdames T. J. Farley, Gallagher and Miss Brennan presided over the fancy good stall, and were ably assisted by Mesdames P. Ring, Harris, Lally, Mardline, Misses Dempster, Smith,  McCallum, Hood, Flowers, Ashworth and Mr Reid.

A busy time was experienced in the refreshment booth, where Mrs J. J. Farley was in charge. Her assistants were Misses Doolan, Norris, Tehan, Gallagher, and Mesdames P. Ring, J. P. O’Brien. The president (Mr T. J Farley), conducted the publican’s booth in a most creditable manner and spent a busy afternoon.

The other most noticeable workers were Messrs J. J. Farley, J. Perry, J. Ring, J. J. Murphy, R. C. Dwyer, M. Tobin, W. Watkins, J. G. Hill, and J. Long. The secretary (Mr T. P. Lewis) was one of the hardest workers on the ground, but he proved himself to be equal to the occasion, and carried out his duties efficiently and well. He was ably supported by the president (Mr T. J. Farley) and the members of the committee, all of whom worked hard to cause things to pass off smoothly.

The following are the details of the various events:

PONY HUNTER.14.2 14.2 and under. First, £8; second, £1,

W. G. Hick’s Hyland Laddie, … 1
J. Ring’s Steele Bell, … … 2
Five competitors.

BOY’S RACE. 16 years and under. First, 7/6; second, 2/6
Victor Lewis … … … 1
Busty McDonald … … … 2
Ken. McKenzie … … … 3

HANDICAP BICYCLE RACE One Mile. First, £2; second £1.
J. McKenzie, 150 yds …… 1
F. Horsbhurgh, 160 yds … 2
O. Wright, 180 yds … … 3

GIRLS’ RACE, Under 15. First, 7/6; second, 2/6.
Elsie Lewis … ….., 1
Lily McDonald … 2..

QUOIT MATCH. First, £1 5s; second, 2/8.
J. Tanian … … …. 1
J. Chapman … … 2

OPEN HUNTERS. First, £6; second, £2,
J. R. Glen’s Victory … … 1
J. G. Robin’s Iona … … 2
J. R. Glen’s Wellington … 3

DRAUGHT HORSE HANDICAP. First, £2 10/ ; second, 10/-.
J. Dwyer’s Iona equal 1
J. Warren’s Patrobas  2
R. Anderson’s Lucky Bean 3

HORSES HIGH JUMP. First, £5; second, £2.
J. G. Robin’s Snowflake, 6ft. 11in. 1
J. R. Glen’s Wallarroo … … 2

LADY’S HUNT. First, £4; second £2,
J. G. Glen’s Victory … 1
W. G. Hick’s Tally Ho … 2
Wellington, Silver Light, Baruna and Iona also competed.

STEPPING THE CHAIN. First, 15/- ; second, 5s.
Mat. McGrath …… … 1
Fred. O’Sullivan … … 2

A grand ball and supper was held in the Shire Hall in the evening, and was a great success, the hall being crowded with trippers of the light fantastic. An open-air picture show was also held in the Barrack Reserve under the auspices of St. Patrick’s Sports Committee, and this, too, like the sports and the ball, was freely patronised.

A special meeting of the McIvor Shire Council was held today to deal with a number of important matters. A full report will appear in our next issue.

(Punctuation and paragraphs  have been added to the above transcription for ease and speed of reading)

Anzac Day 2017

 The following report of the Anzac Day commemoration service, written by Lorraine Gunn, appeared in the May edition of Axedale Antics

What would we do in Axedale without our volunteers? At around 5.30 to 6am on the morning of Anzac Day, no doubt after a restless night, Phil Hughes woke to a rainy morning with a doubtful weather forecast, and he was the organiser of an outdoor celebration of the most solemn day in the Australian calendar. What were his options?
By 6.30 the troops, members of the Axedale Our Town Our Future committee, were rallying to transfer the celebrations to the Axedale Hall and by 8 am. CFA volunteers had breakfast ready for early arrivals.
A wonderful crowd of more than 200 filled the hall and seamlessly, the event proceeded to mark the 102nd anniversary of the landing of Australian and New Zealand troops at Gallipoli.
President of the A.O.T.O.F. committee, Jennifer Jones, gave a speech of welcome and  handed the ceremony over to Phil who conducted the program with dignity and  reverence.
The Mayor of the City of Greater Bendigo, Margaret O’Rourke was in attendance together with representatives of parliamentarians, the R.S.L., school captains and Axedale service and sporting clubs, all of whom laid wreaths. Serving and veteran members of the defence forces were given the opportunity to lay a remembrance poppy followed by members of the public who wished to do so.
In addition we were entertained by the Axedale Primary school choir and the Axedale in Harmony Singers as well as a pipe band and a bugler. The choirs led the singing of the national anthem of New Zealand, first in the Maori language and then in English and to conclude the celebrations, Advance Australia Fair was sung by all participants.

 

Sue Morvell CWA

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Meeting at Axedale 1917

from: Bendigo Advertiser, Tuesday 17 April, 1917, page 6

Meeting in Axedale

 

A largely attended meeting was held in Drake’s hall, Axedale, on Saturday evening.
Mr. J. Heffernan, JP. presided. Convincing addresses were delivered by Mr . D.B. Lazarus Luke Murphy and M. E. O’Brien.

Mr. O’Brien denounced in scathing terms the efforts which were being made in certain quarters to raise the sectarian issue and exhibited a pamphlet which was being circulated in this electorate, and having for it’s object, the segregating of the Catholic vote.

Mr. O’Brien said he did not know in whose interests the leaflet was being distributed, and was cheered for the statement that he could authoritatively affirm that there was absolutely no organised Catholic vote in this electorate; emphasising the fact that though Catholics may have grievances,they cast them to the winds when the Empire needs demand their co-operation.

He further said that at such a time of national stress as this, neither party politics nor religion should prevent us from presenting an undivided front to the powerful arch enemy that sought our destruction.

The speaker further affirmed that, during the 25 years in which he had been privileged to use the franchise, he had never on any occasion been advised how to vote, nor asked how he voted by one of his spiritual advisers, though always in close touch with them.

Referring to the much discussed utterances of a high church dignitary, Mr. O’Brien said that while in church matters .Catholics were solidly united yet in politics their views were varied, and that each intelligent member of that church would resent to the uttermost, any attempt to wield political power or pressure by virtue of spiritual leadership.

Catholics, he said, honored and respected their spiritual Advisers as such, and, so the besmirching of their high and sacred calling by interference in politics would assuredly have the effect of diminishing that loyalty and reverence which Irishmen, and the sons of Irishmen so consistently accord to those whose sole duty it is to minister to their spiritual needs.

 

On the motion of Mr. J.P. Christie, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded the chairman. The meeting terminated with the singing of the National Anthem.

(B. Mundy 214 Hargreaves Street)

(Punctuation and paragraphs  have been added to the above transcription for ease and speed of reading)