Fatal Accident at the Campaspe 1866

 

from: Bendigo Advertiser, 24 April 1866, page 3

axedale inquest

transcription:

INQUESTS

THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT THE CAMPASPE

Yesterday Dr Pounds, the District Coroner, held an inquest at the Campaspe Hotel, Axedale, touching the death of Joseph Scott Bradshaw, who died from a gunshot wound accidentally received on Sunday last.

It appeared from the evidence that the deceased, in company with William Baxter, Thomas Dorham and Alfred Bailes, started from Sandhurst in a spring cart at seven o’clock p.m. on Saturday, for the Campaspe, upon a fishing and shooting excursion.

They reached their destination at ten o’clock that night, and camped out on the side of the river about a mile from Axedale.

They commenced shooting at about five o’clock the following morning, near the spot where they had camped, and at about four p m, when they were thinking of returning to Sandhurst, Bradshaw, Derham and Bailes said they would first enjoy a bathe.

Baxter said that in the meantime he would fire off a couple of shots, and as they had only two guns, he requested the deceased, who carried the powder flask and shot pouch, to load one of the guns, a double-barrelled one, for him.

Bradshaw took up the gun to comply with the request, and whilst holding the butt end on the ground, his left hand over the barrels near their top, and as he was pouring the powder from the flask with his right hand, and before he had put a wad upon it, the other barrel, which was charged with powder and duck shot, exploded, and deceased fell back on the ground, when blood gushed from his face.

The other two young men ran to the spot, and Bailes at once went for Dr O’Grady. After receiving the wound, deceased only lived some ten or fifteen minutes.

Mounted Constable Wright, of Axedale, who was sent for, deposed to finding the gun with one barrel which appeared to have been recently discharged, and both lock hammers down, and under each an exploded percussion cap.

George William Hart, mining, surveyor, said that the deceased had been apprenticed to him. He was not quite nineteen years old,  and was a well conducted, sober lad. He had lent deceased the gun, which was a perfectly safe one. There was no danger of the hammers going off at half-cock.

Dr Atkinson, who had made a post mortem examination, stated that death had resulted from a gunshot wound.

The jury having heard the evidence found  ‘That the deceased, Joseph Scott Bradshaw, came suddenly by his death at the River Campaspe from injuries to his body, caused by the accidental explosion of his gun, it being then charged with powder and shot’.

(Punctuation and paragraphs  have been added to the above transcription for ease and speed of reading)

 

Raid At Axedale 1858

Farmers airing their grievances:

from The Bendigo Advertiser, Wednesday 30 June 1858, page 2

A deputation of the farmers and settlers on the Axe, Emu, Mosquito, Kangaroo, and other creeks between Sandhurst and the Campaspe, waited yesterday on the Police Magistrate, Mr. McLachlan, with reference to the impounding of their cattle, by Mr. Costello, of Axedale.

The deputation set forth the grievances under which they labored, in being subjected to the raids of unscrupulous men, who, under the sanction of law, harassed them at their very thresholds. All they required was justice.

Mr. McLachlan could only say that, as Police Magistrate, he would be most happy to afford the redress the law allowed to aggrieved parties who came before him.

Complaints should be made in the proper manner, and they might depend upon it, that justice would be duly administered.

The settlers, we understand, do not intend to allow the matter to rest here, but will take steps to have their case properly brought under the notice of the Government.

(Punctuation and paragraphs  have been added to the above transcription for ease and speed of reading)

Save

Axedale State School 1902

 

from: The Bendigo Independent, Saturday 19 April, 1902, page 5

A Model Country School

AT AXEDALE.

Several of the State school inspectors. at present visiting the Bendigo district, called at the Axedale State school,  No. 1008 (Mr. E.A. Whitelock head teacher), and entered the following report in the. register:-

April 18, 1902

“We paid an unannounced visit today. .We find the school to be thoroughly well organised and taught.The school largely works itself, as the pupils and monitors are interested in their school life, and have been well trained in their various duties.

The teacher keeps in touch with all classes. The teaching largely achieves the valuable results of getting the children to think, and then to express themselves fully. There is an absence of routine work. There is no mere repetition of the teacher’s thoughts.

The writing. arithmetic, etc. seen, are excellent. The commendable tone in the school can have been created only by skilful devotion to the best interests of the children. The school room is a picture of neatness and taste, and is well equipped with apparatus of all kinds, growing plants, pictures, diagrams etc.

We consider Mr. Whitelock’s work and influence here worthy .of the department’s recognition We hope the parents are appreciative.”

This highly creditable report bears the signatures of no less than four inspectors, namely:-Mr. A. Fussell, district inspector; Mr. P. Goyen, chief inspector, Otago, New Zealand; Mr. Wm. Hamilton (Castlemaine District) and Mr T.W. Bothroyd of the Maryborough district

http://nla.gov.au/nla.newspage24134260

(Punctuation and paragraphs have been added to the above transcription for ease and speed of reading)

Welcome Home Social for Serviceman 1918

from: The Bendigo Independant, 18 October 1918, page 8

COUNTRY NEWS.

AXEDALE.

A welcome home social and presentation was given to Private Geo. Macumber on Wednesday night in Mr. E. Drake’s hall, which was nicely decorated with flags, flowers, etc. by the local red cross ladies.

Cr. J. Hodge presided over a large gathering. The chairman, in opening the proceedings, proposed the toast of the King which was drunk with musical honors.

The chairman, in a very nice speech, made reference to the way in which the guest of the evening, had served his country. Mr. V. Deane and other speakers, also referred to the guest of the evening.

The chairman presented Private Macumber with a nice gold medal as a token and a small remembrance from the people of Axedale. Private Macumber made a suitable response.

The toast of the guests’ parents was proposed by Cr. J. Hodge, who referred to Private Macumber, and also another brother, at present doing his share at the front. . Mr. Joseph Senior, a friend of the family, responded on their behalf.

The toast of the ladies was proposed by Mr. Deane, who referred to the manner in which they had decorated the room and tables, the good things provided, reflecting great credit on them. Mr. J. Hamilton responded.

A vote of thanks was accorded the secretaries, chairman and performers who contributed items during the evening and helped to make this first welcome home social such a great success.

An enjoyable dance followed. The music for the social and dance was supplied by Mr. J. Dunn, and Mr. J. Brook made a successful M.C.

(Punctuation and paragraphs have been added to the above transcription for ease and speed of reading)

Typhoid At Axedale 1914

from: Bendigo Advertiser, 10 November 1914, page 5

TYPHOID AT AXEDALE

A second report by Dr. Gaffney stated – “I inspected the houses where there had been typhoid fever, and especially the sanitary conditions of those dwellings and outhouses. I find there are two sanitary systems in vogue – one a “pan” system and the other the “pit” system.

In a great number of instances the articles used as ‘pans’ were much too small to be adequate. It must be borne in mind – and this is most important – that not only solid but also liquid excretia must be provided for as as the typhoid baccillus is demonstratable in the urine voided by typhoid patients. Given that the receptacle is adequate for both forms of excreta, the next thing is to consider the disposal of the contents.

Burial at a depth of at least 2 ft is essential and in such a place, that there is no possibility of the infection of water supply. There should be provided in the privvies in this system, some disinfectant solution which should be used regularly. It is also very necessary that these receptacles should be protected from flies, which are a most important factor in the dissemination of typhoid fever.

The pit system is a good one if the precautionary measures mentioned later are carried out conscientiously. But if these precautions be neglected, then the pit system would be an extremely pernicious one.

Carelessness or neglect of the precautions would form each pit into an incubator for the typhoid bacilli and would increase in number and virulence to an enormous extent. The first essential is that there be provided a large amount of lime at hand and that each person use it freely.

The second is the protection from flies, as in the other system.

All water for human consumption must be boiled, and all milk sterilised, and scalded.

All food must be protected by means of wire covers, etc from flies. Cleanliness of person, especially in those who have the handling of food, is of paramount importance.

I am afraid that there is going to be a good deal of typhoid fever this year, and in order to check it,  and prevent it getting a hold on the community, it will be necessary to exert the utmost care in every detail.

With regard to Axedale, the distressing seasonal conditions prevailing are the most important factor in this outbreak, and the small number of typhoid cases during the past couple of summers, has given rise to a certain amount of carelessness on the part of the residents, which must be guarded against this summer”.

(Punctuation and paragraphs have been added to the above transcription for ease and speed of reading)

Honouring Axedale Soldiers

from: The Bendigonian, Tuesday 9 March 1915, page 12

HONORING AXEDALE SOLDIERS

Axedale 3rd March

A well-attended meeting was held in Drake’s Hall ,last night to make arrangements for a send off to the three Axedale soldiers at present in camp at Broadmeadows, viz. Messrs. F. Bennett, E. Burke, and F. Millington. Cr. S. Doak presided.

It was decided to hold a social and present each soldier with a gold medal suitably inscribed, on a date to be arranged. Several ladies were present, and they will have charge of the arrangements in connection with the supper.

With Anzac Day coming up, there will be posts about the Axedale Soldiers who lost their lives

New Church at Axedale 1902

from:  Bendigo Advertiser, Saturday 16 August 1902, page 3.
The new Roman Catholic Church at Axedale, which has been designed in the early
English style of Gothic architecture, stands on a very commanding site close to the centre
of the township. The grounds have been suitably fenced in and laid out in a tasteful
manner.
The church consists of nave 48ft.by 26ft., sanctuary 17ft. by 16ft., vestry
14ft.by 11ft., and a porchway at entrance 8ft. by 8ft. The nave has a height in the
centre of 33ft. from the floor line to the apex of the ceiling, and is lighted by nine lancet
headed windows, which are glazed with tinted lead lights.
The sanctuary is placed in the east end of the building, and is octagonal in form, and separated from the nave by means of a wide and lofty Gothic-headed archway, which is suitably embellished with  hard moldings and carved bosses. This apartment is lighted by two lancet-headed windows, and one large rose window, cusped in the form of a quatrefoil.
All these windows are glazed in a very  effective scheme of colored glass decoration.  The vestry is placed on the right hand side of the sanctuary, with access from same as well as from the outside.
The construction of the building throughout is of the most substantial kind. Bluestone is used for all the walls, with brick and.cement dressings to all the doors and windows, and the whole is neatly tuckpointed.
The interior walls are plastered to represent rough cast work, and are suitably lined out and tinted.
The roof principals and ceiling lining are in clean dressed oregon pine, with bold molded cornice and frieze molds.
The whole of the woodwork inside is varnished, thereby preserving the natural grain of the woods employed. Ample provision has been made for both inlet and outlet ventilation.
The nave is furnished with a sufficiency of comfortable seats of neat construction. The sanctuary is railed off by a handsome line of ornamental wrought iron railing, surmounted with a suitable cedar handrail.
The altar is a handsome structure, happily conceived and faithfully carried out in detail to harmonise with the period of Gothic, in which the church is built. All other necessary furnishings have also been provided to make the church complete and ready for the opening day, which is fixed for tomorrow (Sunday).
The building was designed and supervised by Messrs. Keogh and Austen. As R.V.I.A.,
architects, of View Point, Bendigo, the contractors for the work being Messrs. Brett
and Gover of Bendigo. who have carried out their contract most faithfully.
*Please note: This article appeared in the newpaper as a single paragraph. I have chosen to include paragraphs for ease of reading. 
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Recent photo of St. Mary’s Church
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The foundation stone laid 16 February 1902
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 Plaque to commemorate 140 years 1902-2002