Lake Eppalock #OnePlaceLandmarks

The Society for One-Place Studies have put out a series of prompts for One Place Study bloggers and for Social Media posts. I was very keen to include Axedale Then and Now, as prompts such as these, make me stop and think and often lead to me publishing posts on topics that I may not have thought about, otherwise. They also keep me accountable. The prompt for January is Landmarks. I have chosen Lake Eppalock as my Landmark topic.

Lake Eppalock

Lake Eppalock is a huge man-made reservoir of water situated just outside Axedale. Between 1961 and 1964, a large artificial earth and rock dam was created with a spillway across the Campaspe and Coliban rivers. This water was intended to be used for irrigation by farmers of the Campaspe Irrigation district, along with water supply to Bendigo, Heathcote, and in recent years, Ballarat.

Google Maps

Lake Eppalock was built by the State Rivers and Water Supply Commission. The dam wall is 45 metres high and the main embankment 1041 metres long. The surface area of Lake Eppalock is 3011 hectares.

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State Rivers and Water Supply, State Library of Victoria

In years of drought, water levels can get very low. Recreation activities are not possible at these times. When water levels are low, many historical sites are exposed. It’s possible to see ruins of old homesteads, machines used by miners during the gold rush, stone fences, bridge ruins and other items of historic interest.

The photo below shows the ruins of a bridge that existed before the Lake Eppalock area was flooded. This photo was taken in 2009, when Lake Eppalock was almost empty due to severe drought. Only one year after this photo was taken, the drought broke, and heavy rain once again filled the lake. – fadingvictoria.com

Lake Eppalock Photo: http://www.fadingvictoria.com/image/20091230XF9N8270/

Lake Eppalock is also very popular for water sports, with boating, skiing and fishing enthusiasts flocking there during the summer months. There are caravan parks and camping grounds on the foreshore which, in the summer months, when water levels are high, are packed.

Photo: Lake Eppalock Holiday Park
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goldfieldsguide.com.au

Unfortunately farmers and landholders were forced to leave their farms when the State Government made the decision to acquire land in order to build the Eppalock Dam to provide water during crippling droughts. In 2001, a monument was erected on the banks of Lake Eppalock in memory of those who lost their land. The monument features names of people who made up the Eppalock Landholders Association in 1960.

Photo: bendigoadvertiser.com
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axedalethenandnow.com
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axedalethenandnow.com

*Important Note: The Taungurung and Dja Dja Wurrung people are the traditional owners of the land, and today the land and waterways still remain central to their cultural identity. Their role is recognised as being unique in the life of this region.

Sources:
wikipedia
State Library of Vic
bendigoadvertiser.com.au
Trove.nla.gov.au
goldfieldsguide.com.au
fadingvictoria.com
State Library of Cictoria
State Rivers and Water Supply Commission Victoria
Google Maps

©2021 copyright. All rights reserved axedalethenandnow.co

Axedale Burial: Martin & Margaret Mangan

Axedale Catholic Cemetery

Margaret Mangan

From: Bendigo Advertiser, Thursday 12 November 1919, page3
The remains of the late Mrs. Margaret Mangan, wife of Mr. Martin Mangan, were interred in the Axedale Cemetery yesterday. The funeral moved from deceased’s late residence, Kimbolton. The coffin-bearers were Messrs. M. Comer, T. Banfield, J. Noonan, and F. Holmes. The Rev. Father Cremin read the burial service. Messrs. Fizelle and Mulqueen had charge of the funeral arrangements. The deceased lady, who was a native of County Clare, Ireland, was a colonist of 48 years. Six sons and two daughters are left to mourn their loss.

Martin Mangan

From: Bendigo Independent, Wednesday 18 October 1916, page 6
The funeral of Mr. Martin Mangan, of Kimboltan, took place yesterday, to the Axedale Cemetery, leaving his residence at 12 o’clock. He was a resident of the district for upwards of 50 years, and highly respected. He was a native of Clare (Ireland) and leaves a family of five sons and two daughters.
The coffin-bearers were Messrs. J. O’Dwyer, T. Banfield, P. Madden and P. Green. The Rev. Father Kelly read the service at the graveside. Messrs. Fizelle and Mullqueen were the undertakers.

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IN LOVING MEMORY
OF
MARGARET
BELOVED WIFE OF
MARTIN MANGAN
DIED 09 NOV. 1909
AGED 73 YEARS
MAY THE LORD HAVE MERCY ON HER SOUL
ALSO
MARTIN MANGAN
WHO DIED ON THE 16TH OCT. 1916
AGED 88 YEARS
R.I.P.

OBITUARY. (1916, October 18). The Bendigo Independent (Vic. : 1891 – 1918), p. 6. Retrieved November 25, 2020, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219803701

OBITUARY. (1909, November 11). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), p. 3. Retrieved November 24, 2020, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article89885512

©2020 copyright. All rights reserved axedalethenandnow.com

Axedale Burial Molloy 1870

Axedale Catholic Cemetery

 

CHARLES MOLLOY DIED 23 JULY 1870

From: Bendigo Advertiser, Monday, 25 July 1870

SUDDEN DEATH.
The district coroner, Dr J. Pounds, also held an inquest on Saturday, at Axedale, on the body of a man named Charles Molloy, who came suddenly by his death,on the 22nd inst, at his residence there.

After the evidence of a few farmers was taken, which showed that deceased was apparently a healthy man. Dr H. L. Atkinson gave evidence that a lad came to him for some medicine which he gave him, the lad stating that his father was very bad. Witness went to visit deceased, but found him dead. The cause of death was pneumonia of the lungs. The jury returned a verdict accordingly.

ELLEN MOLLOY died 2 September 1900

From: Bendigo Advertiser, Tuesday 4 September 1900

Funeral
The Friends of Mr. Peter Molloy are respectfully invited to follow the remains of his late beloved mother, (Ellen) to the Axedale Cemetery. Funeral to move from his residence, Mount Pleasant, this day, the 4th inst., at ten o’clock.

From: The Elmore Standard, Friday, 07 September 1900, page 2

Our Barnedown correspondent writes I regret to chronicle the death of Mrs. Ellen Molloy, a very old and highly-respected resident of Mount Pleasant, the cause being general breaking-up of the system. The deceased, who was 46 years of age, leaves two sons and two daughters, grown-up. The funeral on Tuesday which moved from the residence of her son, Mr. Peter Molloy, to the Axedale cemetery was largely attended. The burial service was impressively read by the Rev. Father O’Carroll, and Messrs. Fizelle and Mulqueen carried out the funeral arrangements. -• one at die Stamdori News Agency, Is. cadi. Received, “Windsor Magazine”for August and ” Australian Journal” for September. 
FIZELLE and MULQUEEN, Undertakers, Bridge-street.

sacred to the memory
of
charles molloy
died july 23rd 1870, aged 46 years
native of cy kildare, ireland
also
ellen molloy
native of county clare ireland
died sept 2nd 1900 aged 74 years
rest in peace
and their son
peter molloY
died october 23rd 191-0
r.i.p.

SUDDEN DEATH. (1870, July 25). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), p. 2. Retrieved September 12, 2020, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87912909

Family Notices (1900, September 4). Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), p. 4. Retrieved September 12, 2020, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article89617448

“No Title” The Elmore Standard (Vic. : 1882 – 1910) 7 September 1900: 2. Web. 12 Sep 2020 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article253472587&gt;.

©2020 copyright. All rights reserved axedalethenandnow.com

A dastardly act in Axedale 1893

from Bendigo Advertiser Saturday April 1, 1893, page 5

HOW BUSH FIRES ARE CAUSED.

A DASTARDLY ACT.

What is evidently a most despicable and malicious act was perpetrated at Axedale on Wednesday evening, the victim being Mr. N. Ingham, the well-known quarry proprietor and hotel keeper of that place.  On Tuesday after noon an elderly man named Charles Seward, a laborer, arrived by train in Axedale, having been engaged at the Government labor bureau in Melbourne, by Mr. P. J. Cooney, the teacher at the Campaspe East State School, to work for him for 8s per week. On Tuesday evening he camped on the river bank under the bridge at Axedale, and on Wednesday he did some odd jobs for Mr. Ingham, who, however, was dissatisfied with the manner in which the man performed his work.

They had a settlement, and Mr. Ingham told the fellow to move on. Seward asked for a glass of beer, but the request was refused. The man left the hotel muttering vengeance against the landlord. He took his swag and tramped off along the road to Toolleen.

A young man, named Johnson, a woodcarter in the employ of Mr. Minter, was driving a horse and load of wood into Axedale, when he discovered that he had lost a couple of wedges. He walked back along the road and suddenly came on Seward, whom he alleges he saw set fire to a fence in three different places. As soon as Seward saw that he was discovered,he remarked to Johnson, ” You saw me lighting my pipe, didn’t you?” Johnson replied that that excuse was ” too thin, ” as he had seen the man deliberately fire the fence, which belongs to Mr. Ingham.

Seward remarked that if Johnson said a word about the matter he would blow his brain out. He then walked off along the road towards Toolleen. The alarm was raised, and several persons attracted by the smoke hurried to the spot, and by their united efforts subdued the flames, but not before nearly half a mile of fencing and a quantity of grass had been destroyed.

Mounted constable Haydon, who is in charge of the police station at Axedale, was away on duty at the Wild Duck Creek during the day, and on his return home in the evening the matter was reported to him by Mr. Ingham.

The constable at once set off in chase of the offender, and nearing Toolleen, which is about 15 miles distant from Axedale, he noticed a man camping by the roadside. From the description that had been furnished him by Mr. Ingham, the constable arrested the fellow, and on bringing him back to the police station he was fully identified.

He was then locked up on a charge of wilfully and maliciously setting fire to the property. It was a fortunate circumstance that there was not any wind blowing at the time or the adjoining properties of Messrs. Heffernan, Cahill, Brown and others right down to the Clare Inn would probably have been destroyed.

The accused was brought into Bendigo on Thursday by Constable Baydon and, during the afternoon. Mr. J. R. Hoskins, J.P., attended at the Town Hall and remanded the accused, who denied the charge, until Thursday next.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88966222

 

Axedale Concert 1915

The Advocate 04 September 1915

At Mr. Drake’s Hall on Wednesday, 25th August, the annual concert was held in aid of the funds of St. Mary’s Church. The Rev. M. Heffernan occupied the chair.

The attendance was very large and the programme good. The following ladies and gentlemen contributed items: — Misses M. Bentley, C. Ronan, V. O’Donneli, E. and M. O’Connor, and C. J. Drake, Messrs. W. Ruth, J. Herrick J. R. M cDonald, and A. Brown.

 

Mrs. W. Ruth acted as accompanist, and her playing was a feature of the programme. The manner in which the artists rendered their respective items must have been pleasing to the party who travelled from Bendigo over bad roads to entertain the residents of Axedale.

Mr. C. Burke, of Bendigo, with his usual generosity, placed his fine car at the disposal of the artists. He also contributed to the funds by raffling a clock which was won by Mr. R. O’Brien, of the Crown Hotel, Bendigo (ticket No. 39) Mr. W. Hawkins acted as secretary, and was ably assisted by a ladies committee, with, Misses D. Neylon and A Brown as joint secretaries. The Rev. chairman thanked all who assisted to make the concert such a social and financial success.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article151760857

(Punctuation and paragraphs  have been added to the above transcription for ease and speed of reading)

Axedale Tornado 1930

from: The Weekly Times Melbourne 04 January 1930, page 6

Axedale Tornado

TORNADO SWEEPS TOWNSHIPS

Axedale and Knowsley Suffer

 

Swooping along on a two mile front late in the afternoon of December 25, a terrific tornado caused extensive damage. The townships which suffered most were Knowsley, where not a building escaped damage, and Axedale.

The storm passed Bendigo more than 15 miles to the south, and levelled many trees and much fencing. All railway and post office telegraph lines are down between Heathcote and Bendigo, Axedale being the furthest station which can be picked up.

Reports stated that uprooted trees blocked the roadway and probably the railway line between Derrinal and Axedale. Gangs have been sent to inspect the railway line and restore the telegraph service. Bendigo hardly felt the blow.

Homes Unroofed
The tornado was one of the most severe experienced in the Bendigo district. So far, no word has been received of loss of life. The severest section of the storm was from the fringe of the Wellsford Forest across Axe Creek to Axedaie and then on to Longlea.

The tornado had a width of two miles and took only about three minutes to pass over. It was followed by heavy rain averaging an inch.

When the storm left the forest, it first struck the home of Mr William Hawkins 4 1/2 miles from Axedale, on the banks of Axe Creek. Most of the house was unroofed, and damage was done to the outbuildings and fencing About a mile nearer Axedale the homestead of Messrs. Hawkins Bros was also struck by the storm, and fiverooms of the seven roomed house were unroofed. Extensive damage was caused to the outbuildings.

Similar damage was caused at other farms at Axedale. Mr D. Cochrane, who had been building a new home, had erected a large garage, workshop and shed. This and his house were badly twisted, and portions were blown away. Part of the house was lifted from its foundations.

Main Roads Blocked
Between this place and the Axedale township, many trees were blown down, and the main Bendigo Road was blocked. The roof of an unococupied house was torn off.

Mr J. Clyne’s house was damaged, and the properties of Messrs W. Weston, J. Ryan and W. S. Millington suffered. The roof of Mr H. Doyle’s house was lifted bodily and parts were scattered in all directions.

A valuable trotting horse, the property of Mr John Brundle, became frightened and took shelter in a corner, where a tree fell on it. It was rescued unhurt.

The storm next travelled to the Marydale Estate, owned by Mr F. Keighraan. The wool shed was wrecked and much fencing was destroyed.

Church Destroyed
When the motor train from Wallan arrived in Bendigo 30 minutes late today, the staff reported that Knowsley had appeared to get the fury of the storm Not a single place in the old township remained Intact.

The Roman Catholic Church, -a weatherboard building, and a private house were razed to the ground.

The goods shed at the station and the the railway caretaker’s house were unroofed. The verandah and roof of May’s store were torn off and a motor garage in the town suffered badly.

All along the railway line, trees and telegraph poles had been torn up and. strewn over the line. Gangs of men worked ail night to clear the line, Mrs. Hunter, Mr. Harop and Mrs .J. Evans, at Knowsley, were heavy losers by the storm

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223898791

(Punctuation and paragraphs  have been added to the above transcription for ease and speed of reading)

Sale of St. Pauls Anglican Church Axedale

The following article was on The Bendigo Advertiser website on 12 July 2017. Could be the start of a huge combined effort by the Axedale community:

A progress association president says it is “now or never” for community action to keep an Axedale church from being sold into private hands.

The St Paul’s Anglican Church congregation last met in 2015 and the Anglican Diocese of Bendigo wants it rezoned and sold.

This Thursday the Axedale Our Town Our Future committee will consider stepping in to rally support to keep it in community hands.

The church was build in 1913. In recent times the congregation had diminished until it consisted of just two families, the diocese’ general manager Naomi Fountain said.

Two years ago the diocese and its Axedale Parish made the decision to stop services at the church, which Mrs Fountain described as “heartbreaking”.

 img_1986

“We are very much a rural diocese (and) we work very hard in rural parishes to maintain a sense of community and ministry,”  she said.

Mrs Fountain said work had begun to rezone the property for residential use, though plans for a sales date was some time away.

AOTOF president Jennifer Jones said the turnout at a recent public information session showed there was some interest within the community for the church to remain a public institution.

She stressed any action to keep the building open to the public was still in early days, but could involve community groups purchasing it and surrounding land.

It was unclear how much support any plan would have if it was taken to the wider community, though Mrs Fountain said once the property was on the market the diocese would be open to community groups’ interest.

A community purchase would not come without what Ms Jones described as a “huge effort”.

A community committee would most likely be needed to drive fundraisers, grant applications and other work needed to raise money and coordinate any campaign.

Nor were there yet any concrete examples of what the building and grounds would be used for.

“My personal opinion is that it could become a community house or a small community hub,” Ms Jones said.

She said a recent survey had shown a need for space to house the area’s community groups.

“Axedale is growing. There’s lots of young families coming here,” Ms Jones said.

More Axedale Public Hall memories

from Axedale Antics, Issue 146, September 2008

Axedale Public Hall

IMG_5308

“Last month’s article in praise of the Axedale Public Hall inspired a couple of locals to contact the Antics and pass on a few memories. We welcome this feedback and hope that more of you will be inspired to add your own snippets of information to our fund of local knowledge.

Apparently, in it’s hey day, the Axedale Hall had the reputation of having the best dance floor anywhere in the district and people came from far and wide to do the Pride of Erin, the Barn Dance, Maxina, Charmaine, Evening Three Step, Modern Waltz and the Foxtrot, among other old time dances.

The hall custodians prepared the floor by scattering wax flakes or crystals and then ‘bagging’ the floor. Sometimes a box, covered in hessian or carpet was used and often small children helped the operation by riding on the bags or on top of the box, to add a bit of weight. The Dunlop family have been closely associated with the hall and Roy Dunlop was the regular M.C. or Master of Ceremonies. Peter and Kate Dunlop continue this involvement; Peter being the Secretary of the Hall Committee.

Music for the dancing was usually just provided by the piano and drums, and Maisie Evans and Win Byrne were regular pianists with Les Giri on the drums. Power for the dances, balls, and other entertainments was provided by a generator powered by an old Fordson tractor, which on occasions was notoriously difficult to start.  There was a house on the corner of McIvor Highway and Mitchell Street, where the barbecue now stands, and the tractor was kept there, at the ready. Before it’s demolition, the house was the residence of the two Misses Ryan.

Although it is hard for us to imagine life without electricity, it only came to Axedale in December 1955, and country life was beginning to change. Young people were beginning to be known as ‘teenagers’.  Some of them were even getting their own cars at 18 years of age, (although at Bendigo Teachers College in 1955, only 3 out of 200 had a car).

Rock and Roll music became popular. Shock horror, Elvis Presley ousted Johnny Ray (of ‘Crying’ Fame) and Bill Haley and The Comets burst onto the scene in the film “Rock Around The Clock’.

The first drive-in picture theatre opened in 1956 and competed with The Lyric, The Plaza, and The Princess, which were the existing Bendigo picture theatres at that time.

Dances were held at the YMCA and St. Killian’s on Saturday nights, and once a year a grand presentation ball was held in the Bendigo Town Hall, where each student was presented to the Mayor of Bendigo

November 1956 saw the arrival of TV, in time for the Melbourne Olympic Games, and even the liquor licences were changing.  We said goodbye to the ‘6 o’clock swill’ and social life changed.  Young people were mobile, dinner dances became popular, and by the time I returned to this district in 1965, the hall was used infrequently and carried a burden of debt.

Sometimes a new resident comes to a town, views the scene from a new perspective, and decides to make a difference. Such a person was Senior Constable A.E. (Ted) Godkin, who came to Axedale from Nagambie in 1967.

Ted could probably be described as a ‘sportsnut’.  He was a champion lawn bowler and was immediately snapped up as a Pennant player by a top Bendigo club.  He soon observed that Axedale had no sporting facilities at all apart from a sadly neglected public reserve, covered in 10ft high thistles, and a flat area where a couple of granite posts were the only remains of a tennis court.  Then there was this beautiful hall, which stood like a white elephant, rarely used, and almost a liability to the community who still had to finish paying for it.

Having played an indoor version of the game of bowls in earlier days, Ted could envisage a regular competition which would provide recreation for people of all ages and an income stream to the Hall Committee.  He lost no time in borrowing the necessary bowls, mats and measuring equipment, and spread the word around the district.

I’ll never forget the first bowls night.  The Axedale people sat on one side of the hall while the Knowsley people sat on the other, because they didn’t really know each other at all well.   The “Blowinskis” those of us who were new to the district, sat across the front while Ted explained the finer points.

It took off like wildfire.  We managed for a while with borrowed equipment but soon were able to purchase new mats and sets of bias bowls.  Indoor bowls was played two  nights each week, Wednesday and Saturday, and it wasn’t long before Tournaments and Championships were on the agenda.  We were able to fit seven mats in the hall, so it was not uncommon to have more than 100 participants.  With a regular rental income, the Hall Committee soon covered the existing debt and went from strength to strength.

An extremely hard working Hall Committee Ladies Auxiliary ( a plaque in the hall commemorates a lifetime of service by Mon Colvin, 23 years as Secretary) ran an annual casserole luncheon, three debutante balls and formed a Euchre club.

Best of all, we got to know our neighbours and made lasting friendships.  The Axedale Indoor Bowling Club functioned for more than 30 years until the cost of public liability insurance became prohibitive but in future issues we will explain how the sporting facilities we enjoy today sprang from the foundation

**written by Axedale resident, Lorraine Gunn