Axedale Tornado 1930

from: The Weekly Times Melbourne 04 January 1930, page 6

Axedale Tornado

TORNADO SWEEPS TOWNSHIPS

Axedale and Knowsley Suffer

 

Swooping along on a two mile front late in the afternoon of December 25, a terrific tornado caused extensive damage. The townships which suffered most were Knowsley, where not a building escaped damage, and Axedale.

The storm passed Bendigo more than 15 miles to the south, and levelled many trees and much fencing. All railway and post office telegraph lines are down between Heathcote and Bendigo, Axedale being the furthest station which can be picked up.

Reports stated that uprooted trees blocked the roadway and probably the railway line between Derrinal and Axedale. Gangs have been sent to inspect the railway line and restore the telegraph service. Bendigo hardly felt the blow.

Homes Unroofed
The tornado was one of the most severe experienced in the Bendigo district. So far, no word has been received of loss of life. The severest section of the storm was from the fringe of the Wellsford Forest across Axe Creek to Axedaie and then on to Longlea.

The tornado had a width of two miles and took only about three minutes to pass over. It was followed by heavy rain averaging an inch.

When the storm left the forest, it first struck the home of Mr William Hawkins 4 1/2 miles from Axedale, on the banks of Axe Creek. Most of the house was unroofed, and damage was done to the outbuildings and fencing About a mile nearer Axedale the homestead of Messrs. Hawkins Bros was also struck by the storm, and fiverooms of the seven roomed house were unroofed. Extensive damage was caused to the outbuildings.

Similar damage was caused at other farms at Axedale. Mr D. Cochrane, who had been building a new home, had erected a large garage, workshop and shed. This and his house were badly twisted, and portions were blown away. Part of the house was lifted from its foundations.

Main Roads Blocked
Between this place and the Axedale township, many trees were blown down, and the main Bendigo Road was blocked. The roof of an unococupied house was torn off.

Mr J. Clyne’s house was damaged, and the properties of Messrs W. Weston, J. Ryan and W. S. Millington suffered. The roof of Mr H. Doyle’s house was lifted bodily and parts were scattered in all directions.

A valuable trotting horse, the property of Mr John Brundle, became frightened and took shelter in a corner, where a tree fell on it. It was rescued unhurt.

The storm next travelled to the Marydale Estate, owned by Mr F. Keighraan. The wool shed was wrecked and much fencing was destroyed.

Church Destroyed
When the motor train from Wallan arrived in Bendigo 30 minutes late today, the staff reported that Knowsley had appeared to get the fury of the storm Not a single place in the old township remained Intact.

The Roman Catholic Church, -a weatherboard building, and a private house were razed to the ground.

The goods shed at the station and the the railway caretaker’s house were unroofed. The verandah and roof of May’s store were torn off and a motor garage in the town suffered badly.

All along the railway line, trees and telegraph poles had been torn up and. strewn over the line. Gangs of men worked ail night to clear the line, Mrs. Hunter, Mr. Harop and Mrs .J. Evans, at Knowsley, were heavy losers by the storm

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223898791

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Concert at Drake’s Hall 1915

from: The Advocate, Saturday 04 September, 1915, page 14

drakes hall

transcription:     AXEDALE

At Mr. Drake’s Hall on Wednesday, 25th August, the annual concert was held, in aid of the funds of St. Mary’s Church. The Rev. M. Heffernan occupied the chair.

The attendance was very large and the programme good. The following ladies and gentlemen contributed items: — Misses M. Bentley, C. Ronan, V. O’Donnell, E. and M. O’Connor, and C. J. Drake, Messrs. W. Ruth, J. Herrick J. R. McDonald, and A. Brown.

Mrs. W. Ruth acted as accompanist, and her playing was a feature of the programme.

The manner in which the artists rendered their respective items must have been pleasing to the party who travelled from Bendigo over bad roads to entertain the residents of Axedale.

Mr. C. Burke, of Bendigo, with his usual generosity, placed his fine car at the disposal of the artists. He also contributed to the funds by raffling a clock which was won by Mr. R. O’Brien, of the Crown Hotel, Bendigo (ticket No. 39)

Mr. W. Hawkins acted as secretary, and was ably assisted by a ladies committee, with, Misses D. Neylon and A Brown as joint secretaries. The Rev. chairman thanked all who assisted to make the concert such a social and financial success.

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Meeting at Axedale 1917

from: Bendigo Advertiser, Tuesday 17 April, 1917, page 6

Meeting in Axedale

 

A largely attended meeting was held in Drake’s hall, Axedale, on Saturday evening.
Mr. J. Heffernan, JP. presided. Convincing addresses were delivered by Mr . D.B. Lazarus Luke Murphy and M. E. O’Brien.

Mr. O’Brien denounced in scathing terms the efforts which were being made in certain quarters to raise the sectarian issue and exhibited a pamphlet which was being circulated in this electorate, and having for it’s object, the segregating of the Catholic vote.

Mr. O’Brien said he did not know in whose interests the leaflet was being distributed, and was cheered for the statement that he could authoritatively affirm that there was absolutely no organised Catholic vote in this electorate; emphasising the fact that though Catholics may have grievances,they cast them to the winds when the Empire needs demand their co-operation.

He further said that at such a time of national stress as this, neither party politics nor religion should prevent us from presenting an undivided front to the powerful arch enemy that sought our destruction.

The speaker further affirmed that, during the 25 years in which he had been privileged to use the franchise, he had never on any occasion been advised how to vote, nor asked how he voted by one of his spiritual advisers, though always in close touch with them.

Referring to the much discussed utterances of a high church dignitary, Mr. O’Brien said that while in church matters .Catholics were solidly united yet in politics their views were varied, and that each intelligent member of that church would resent to the uttermost, any attempt to wield political power or pressure by virtue of spiritual leadership.

Catholics, he said, honored and respected their spiritual Advisers as such, and, so the besmirching of their high and sacred calling by interference in politics would assuredly have the effect of diminishing that loyalty and reverence which Irishmen, and the sons of Irishmen so consistently accord to those whose sole duty it is to minister to their spiritual needs.

 

On the motion of Mr. J.P. Christie, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded the chairman. The meeting terminated with the singing of the National Anthem.

(B. Mundy 214 Hargreaves Street)

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Fatal Accident at the Campaspe 1866

 

from: Bendigo Advertiser, 24 April 1866, page 3

axedale inquest

transcription:

INQUESTS

THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT THE CAMPASPE

Yesterday Dr Pounds, the District Coroner, held an inquest at the Campaspe Hotel, Axedale, touching the death of Joseph Scott Bradshaw, who died from a gunshot wound accidentally received on Sunday last.

It appeared from the evidence that the deceased, in company with William Baxter, Thomas Dorham and Alfred Bailes, started from Sandhurst in a spring cart at seven o’clock p.m. on Saturday, for the Campaspe, upon a fishing and shooting excursion.

They reached their destination at ten o’clock that night, and camped out on the side of the river about a mile from Axedale.

They commenced shooting at about five o’clock the following morning, near the spot where they had camped, and at about four p m, when they were thinking of returning to Sandhurst, Bradshaw, Derham and Bailes said they would first enjoy a bathe.

Baxter said that in the meantime he would fire off a couple of shots, and as they had only two guns, he requested the deceased, who carried the powder flask and shot pouch, to load one of the guns, a double-barrelled one, for him.

Bradshaw took up the gun to comply with the request, and whilst holding the butt end on the ground, his left hand over the barrels near their top, and as he was pouring the powder from the flask with his right hand, and before he had put a wad upon it, the other barrel, which was charged with powder and duck shot, exploded, and deceased fell back on the ground, when blood gushed from his face.

The other two young men ran to the spot, and Bailes at once went for Dr O’Grady. After receiving the wound, deceased only lived some ten or fifteen minutes.

Mounted Constable Wright, of Axedale, who was sent for, deposed to finding the gun with one barrel which appeared to have been recently discharged, and both lock hammers down, and under each an exploded percussion cap.

George William Hart, mining, surveyor, said that the deceased had been apprenticed to him. He was not quite nineteen years old,  and was a well conducted, sober lad. He had lent deceased the gun, which was a perfectly safe one. There was no danger of the hammers going off at half-cock.

Dr Atkinson, who had made a post mortem examination, stated that death had resulted from a gunshot wound.

The jury having heard the evidence found  ‘That the deceased, Joseph Scott Bradshaw, came suddenly by his death at the River Campaspe from injuries to his body, caused by the accidental explosion of his gun, it being then charged with powder and shot’.

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Inquests at Axedale 1874

Inquests into the deaths of two babies were held in Axedale on 27 October 1874 at the Raglan Hotel and Drakes Hotel.

transcription: 

INQUESTS

The district coroner held an inquest yesterday, at the Raglan Hotel, Axedale, on the body of Ann Mulcare, a child ten weeks old, who had been found dead in a cradle on the previous day. The evidence given, showed that the child had been left at home, in charge of an elder sister, whilst the mother was in Sandhurst.

The child had been put to bed, but on going to the cradle afterwards, the sister found that the child was dead. In putting her to bed, care was taken that the clothes did not cover her face, and these were in the same position when it was discovered that the child was lifeless.

Dr. Macgillivray stated that he had made a post mortem examination of the body, which was that of a well nourished child. The brain was much congested, and the lungs in part only, showing that the child had not been suffocated. The cause of death was congestion of the brain. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

An inquest was subsequently held at Drake’s Hotel, Campaspe, on the body of Bertie Gloster, a child five months old, who also died on the previous day. Rosa Gloster, the mother, stated that a week ago the child took a cold, but finding that it was not getting better she determined to come to Sandhurst for medical advice.

On the road, about two miles from her place, the child died. Dr. Macgillivray stated that the cause of death was acute pneumonia and pleurisy, and the jury returned a verdict to that effect.

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Axedale State School 1902

 

from: The Bendigo Independent, Saturday 19 April, 1902, page 5

A Model Country School

AT AXEDALE.

Several of the State school inspectors. at present visiting the Bendigo district, called at the Axedale State school,  No. 1008 (Mr. E.A. Whitelock head teacher), and entered the following report in the. register:-

April 18, 1902

“We paid an unannounced visit today. .We find the school to be thoroughly well organised and taught.The school largely works itself, as the pupils and monitors are interested in their school life, and have been well trained in their various duties.

The teacher keeps in touch with all classes. The teaching largely achieves the valuable results of getting the children to think, and then to express themselves fully. There is an absence of routine work. There is no mere repetition of the teacher’s thoughts.

The writing. arithmetic, etc. seen, are excellent. The commendable tone in the school can have been created only by skilful devotion to the best interests of the children. The school room is a picture of neatness and taste, and is well equipped with apparatus of all kinds, growing plants, pictures, diagrams etc.

We consider Mr. Whitelock’s work and influence here worthy .of the department’s recognition We hope the parents are appreciative.”

This highly creditable report bears the signatures of no less than four inspectors, namely:-Mr. A. Fussell, district inspector; Mr. P. Goyen, chief inspector, Otago, New Zealand; Mr. Wm. Hamilton (Castlemaine District) and Mr T.W. Bothroyd of the Maryborough district

http://nla.gov.au/nla.newspage24134260

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More on shearers poisoning 1858

Recently I posted about shearers who were poisoned by their cook, when arsenic was mistaken for flour. Following are the names of three of the shearers who died. As yet I haven’t identified the fourth victim.
John FLETCHER, aged about 23 years;
Robert FREELAND, aged about 44 years;
Edward John MORGAN, 29 years.

Below, is a follow up report of the incident.

from: The Bendigo Advertiser, 16 Jun 1858, page 2transcription:

FATAL MISTAKE WITH ARSENIC.

The late melancholy occurrence at the station of Messrs Cox and Bissett, on the Campaspe, concerning, which it will be seen by a paragraph in another column, that a fourth victim has been added to the sad list, has directed public attention to the fatal results from the careless use of arsenic.

It is, indeed, most extraordinary that nothing has been done by the Legislature, to protect the public from such fatal mistakes, as have occurred in the colony, and especially in the interior, from the similarity of arsenic to flour. The neglect is the more inexcusable, seeing that there is a law in England on the subject, which seems to have been copied in New Zealand.

On this subject the Herald remarks

” A correspondent sends us the following excellent suggestions, upon a subject which has caused much discussion without at present any practical results:- Sir, -The number of cases which have occurred in this colony of death from poison, by using arsenic in mistake for flour, has induced me to trouble you with a few remarks.

I perceive that in New Zealand the law requires that this article immediately upon being imported shall be mixed with soot to render it repulsive to the eye and taste, and distinguish it from flour, while it prevents even its wilful administration in all those cases where neither the color nor taste of pure arsenic would give warning of its presence.

You must be acquainted with the circumstances connected with the cases in which it has been used in mistake, and I need not urge them on you as a means of inducing you to exertions to prevent their recurrence; and would simply suggest that it would be most desirable if all the squatters who hold this article for the use of their stations, and the merchants and others who have it in their possession, would mix sufficient soot with it to render it impossible to be mistaken for flour.

At a future day it may be well to consider the necessity of passing a law on the subject. There can be no expense attending the mixture, and the valuable lives it may save should be a sufficient incentive to take the little trouble there would be in the proprietors ordering it at once to be done on their stations, and in the stores in town.

-Your obedient humble servant, X.'”

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